Can "media visibility" be used as a surrogate for market research?

The current Canadian government has made no secret of its disdain for traditional public opinion research. They have slashed budgets for public opinion research and curtailed the number of studies being commissioned.

So, it’s not surprising that alternatives to conventional market research should be a hot topic in Canada’s capital.

The Ottawa Chapter of the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association will feed this discussion at an upcoming luncheon seminar. According to the event description:

Michael Sloboda, Director of Media Intelligence for MediaMiser, will give a presentation revolving around both social and traditional media scans, content analysis and how to combine tone, attention, and prominence to derive a metric for Media Visibility. This will apply to print, online, and broadcast media.

This concept (Media Visibility) is being used both private and public companies and departments as a surrogate for primary market research such as surveys and to corroborate other types of analysis in activities such as program evaluations and benchmarking. The presenter will review the method, tools, and present a case study.

This presentation will provide the audience with a new approach to get an understanding of public opinions on issues, programs, or brands via media scanning and content analysis.

This sounds interesting. It’s not something I’ve gotten my mind around. So I plan to attend to hear what Michael has to say.

What do you think? Is this a concept you’re familiar with? Do you subscribe to the notion that “media visibility” can be used as a surrogate for primary market research?

  • alan chumley

    Combining tone, attention, and prominence to derive a metric for Media Visibility.

    So many companies have som many variations on this theme. CISION’s net effect / net impact score. Our (CARMA) favorability rating.

    They can be useful, no question. But I think we need to be careful not to ‘score’ traditional and social media the same way.

    They are phenomenally different, obviosuly. They should be approached very differently from an analytical perspective.

    A simple traditional media ‘score’ applied to social media couldn’t possibly account for somethign as dynamic, multi-dimensional as a conversation and a community of interest with a static, offline traditional metric.

    7C’s of social media measurement:
    http://www.carma.com/blog/2010/7/6/the-7cs-of-social-media-measurement.html

    5P’s of an influencer:
    http://www.carma.com/blog/2011/2/4/whats-your-definition-of-an-influencer.html

    Alan Chumley
    SVP
    CARMA International, Global Media Analysts
    @alanchumley
    @CARMA_Tweets

    • Thank you Alan for the detailed comment. This is why I still love blogging. I asked a question and received an expert response. And now it’s here for everyone to share.

  • Andrew Laing

    Cormex was using these valence variables to weight data in the early 1990s. Helps to differentiate the front-page story in the arts section of the Globe on Terry’s new novel from the brief buried review in the Antigonish Casket. I agree with Alan – not sure accurate it is to say (or how receptive MRIA will be to the message) that media content analysis techniques serve as an alternative to public opinion measures, but tweet about it when you’re there.

    Andrew Laing, PhD
    President, Cormex Research

    • Andrew, I definitely will share my perceptions on Twitter. The session is Feb 23 at noon, if you want to look over my shoulder. I’ll use the #MRIA hashtag.

  • Brett Serjeantson

    I agree with Alan. MediaMiser handles social media differently from traditional media.

    There are ways of correlating the data. However, people should be avoid combining too much.

    Looks like we’re going to have a fun time at the event.

    BTW: We’re having Michael fitted for a flak jacket. Please leave your knives at the door. 🙂

    Brett Serjeantson
    MediaMiser CEO

    http://twitter.com/@bserjeantson
    http://twitter.com/@mediamiser

    http://www.mediamiser.com
    http://www.turningnewsintoknowledge.com

    • Brett, No knives will be in the room (other than the butter knives.) I think the comments on this post underline that this is an area in which we can have a vigorous discussion as we work our way forward to integrate old and new media. I’m looking forward to Michael’s presentation.