Inside PR 446: Let’s talk about podcasting on the verge

Is podcasting on the verge of tipping from a creator-driven medium to an advertiser-driven channel? UNU predicts the trends. Microsoft gets LinkedIn. And crises bring out the best in both social and mainstream media. Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley tackle these topics and more in this week’s Inside PR podcast.

#IPRMustKnow

Midroll acquires Stitcher

A big deal by podcasting standards. Podcast advertising broker Midroll has acquired Stitcher. I think that independent podcasters have reason to worry that, if successful, Midroll/Stitcher will do to podcasting what Facebook did to the open Web. Martin and Gini are still making up their minds about this. Whatever your view, if you care about podcasting, this is an #IPRMustKnow.

Who knew UNU?

UNU is a site that uses the wisdom of the crowd to answer questions and predict trends. Very 2008.

Microsoft acquires LinkedIn

The news that Microsoft is acquiring LinkedIn broke just before we recorded this episode. So here you get our first impressions of the potential benefits and downsides of Microsoft’s integration of LinkedIn with its Office suite.

Crisis brings out the best in us

Finally, in the wake of the Orlando shootings, we reflect on the current state of crisis communications, how news flows through social media and the important role of mainstream media to establish context, discern authoritative, credible witness testimony and curate the reports from social media.

 

This article is cross-posted on Inside PR.

Teaching an old podcast new tricks

FIR_itunes cover_Inside_PRThe Inside PR podcast has been continuously produced since 2006. That’s a long time. Gini DietrichMartin Waxman and I have co-hosted the podcast for half of that time. (We took over from the podcast’s original co-hosts, Terry Fallis (who also co-founded Thornley Fallis) and David Jones.)

Ten years in, we’re making a change to the way that we record Inside PR that could lead to a significant change to the format of the show that we publish.

For all of its life, we have recorded Inside PR as a double ender, with the hosts each recording their tracks locally on their computer or a dedicated recorder. Following recording, we upload our individual tracks to a shared dropbox. Then the show’s producer edit combines the voice tracks together with the musical intros and outros, edits out the bloopers (yes, there are even more than the ones that you hear) and runs the finished product through a program called Auphonic to eliminate background rumble and level the sound across the different input sources.

Screenshot 2015-12-31 07.52.05About a month ago, we started to use a new tool, Zoom.us that transforms the way that we record the show and opens the possibility to making it available as a video podcast as well as an audio podcast.

Zoom.us replaces the double ender recording of individual tracks onto separate devices with a single online recording which can be downloaded as a single, level-balanced track. This eliminates a lot of work. But even more importantly, it also enables us to capture the recording on video. And we’re keen to add a video component to what until now has been an audio-only podcast.

For now it’s an experiment. If you listen closely to Inside PR episode 428, you’ll hear some significant variations in the sound quality between Gini, Martin and I. We’re attempting to identify the source of the differences – mic quality, the age and specs of the computer, the quality of the internet connection are the obvious first candidates for scrutiny. But as we bring up the general quality level, we hope to move on to offer a video feed in addition to the traditional audio feed. So, stay tuned for that.

How do I get started editing my podcast with GarageBand?

Last year I bought a Mac. It came with GarageBand preinstalled. I’ve used Audacity for years to edit the Inside PR podcast. However, I think it’s time to bite the bullet and give GarageBand a shot.

Audacity is great. But I want to learn a new tool. So that I’m not dependent on a single tool. Because so many other podcasters tell me they use GarageBand, and I want to understand why they like it. And so that I can reassure myself that Audacity has kept up with the times.

So I open up GarageBand and go to the Help files to learn how to use it. Where’s the tutorial? There’s no tutorial! What the heck, Apple?!?!

Yes, there are Help text files and pictures. But they seem to be geared to people who want to produce music. Nothing I can find in the help files really guides me in creating a podcast.

Time to turn to Google and search for “GarageBand tutorials.” Long story short – the Google results are led by Lynda.com tutorials. They’re good. But I don’t really want to purchase a subscription to Lynda.com.

Where else can I turn? YouTube, of course. A quick search on YouTube turns up several tutorials posted by enthusiasts, people who love to create things and publish them to help others.

I find exactly what I’m looking for – thanks to Ryan Palmer. His video, embedded in this post, shows me how to create my audio track, add a musical intro and outro, and export my finished file as an MP3. These are exactly the basics I’m looking for, the things that any podcaster needs to get going.

Ryan helped me with his video – offered freely to me and others. So, what could I do to thank him? Well, this post with the embed to his video is one small way I can say thanks. At the time that I viewed Ryan’s video, it had 11,184 views and 111 recommendations. If you discover this post and watch Ryan’s video and give it a thumbs up – if it gets even one more view, I’ll feel that I’ve given back to him the best kind of thanks I can offer.

So, if you are a podcaster wondering how to get started editing your podcast in GarageBand, watch Ryan’s video. I’m sure you’ll find it useful.

And if you do, think about recommending it to someone else.

Thanks Ryan. Your video was exactly what I needed to get me started in GarageBand. 🙂

Inside PR Podcast: I want content that's relevant to me. How about you?

I’m a big fan of podcasts. I listen to them in the car, at home, while I’m on the treadmill and on the subway. Thanks to podcasting, I can listen to my favorite programs when and where it’s convenient for me. But what’ s even better about podcasts is that I can find content that focuses on my interests. And my interests are much narrower than the general public’ s interests. This isn’t broadcasting. It’s content for me and my community.

Each week, Martin Waxman, Gini Dietrich and I record the Inside PR podcast. We talk about things that interest us as communications professionals who are also exploring the changes that social software and social networking have made possible in the ways that people find one another, form relationships and interact. We try to talk about what’ s really going on, not just what happened. So we look for the truths and trends that underlie the communications and technology developments of the week.

It’ s fun for us to share our thoughts. But it’ s even better when you tell us what you think. So, please do give us your ideas for what we should talk about on inside PR. You can reach us on our Inside PR podcast Facebook Group, by leaving a comment on the Inside PR blog, or by tweeting to @inside_PR.

Don’ t be a stranger. Don’ t be shy. Let us know what matters to you and what you would like Inside PR to talk about.

And because seeing is better than reading, here’s my video invitation to participate in setting the agenda for Inside PR.

Nora Young adds some Spark to Third Tuesday

norayoungNora Young is fascinated by how people adopt and apply technology in their lives. And she share her passion every week on CBC Radio One’s Spark. In fact, the program has been so well received that the corporation recently announced that it will be lengthened to an hour in the autumn.

But Nora’s Spark isn’t just a radio program. It’s also a much listened-to podcast that can be listened to at any time. And it’s a blog which offers subscribers a chance to listen to complete undedited interviews that were shortened to fit into the broadcast program. Even more, it’s a blog where Nora and the Sparks production team solicit community input on story ideas that they are developing. And of course, it’s also a Twitter ID that Nora and her team use to tell people about what’s happening with Spark and to have conversations with them.

Nora is truly the new generation of broadcaster. As the traditional model tumbles down, as newspapers are closed, as television stations are closed and as radio budgets are cut, one thing is for sure. Nora Young will be using the media that her community has migrated to.

ThirdTuesdayTorontoSo, I’m really looking forward to Nora’s appearance at Third Tuesday Toronto on June 23. She’ll be sharing with us the lessons she’s learned from her journey into social media. What were the bumps? How did she overcome them? What has been most successful? Where does she see things going in the future?

If you’re interested in celebrating the potential of new media and talking with someone who is showing how to bridge traditional media and social media, I hope you’ll join us on June 23. You can register online to attend Third Tuesday with Nora Young.

As always, I’d like to give a shoutout to our sponsors: Our founding sponsor, CNW Group has been joined by the Berkeley Heritage Event Venue to help us make this event possible. Thank you to our sponsors. We couldn’t do Third Tuesday without you.

Inside PR to kick off its Third Year at Third Tuesday Toronto

ThirdTuesdayTorontoWe’re planning a special Third Tuesday Toronto on April 2.

For the past two years, David Jones and Terry Fallis have recorded the Inside PR podcast every week without fail. That’s 104 episodes without a single missed week. And throughout this time, they’ve enlightened and entertained us with news, insight and humorous reflections on social media and the world of public relations and corporate communications. And not only are they still going strong, but with episode 101, Dave and Terry gave the podcast fresh energy by adding an Inside PR panel. So far, the panelists have included Martin Waxman, Keith McArthur, Julie Rusciolelli and Michelle Sullivan.

David and Terry also were among the original group of Third Tuesday Toronto organizers, along with Ed Lee and Chris Clarke.

Inside PRSo, what better way to kick off the Inside PR’s third year of podcasts than by recording Episode 105 live at Third Tuesday Toronto?

Register to attend to join Terry, Dave and the Inside PR panelists, for the recording of the 105th. episode of Inside PR. Bring your questions and comments and plan to participate in what should be a fun and memorable podcast.

As always, a special note of thanks to our sponsors, CNW Group. CNW covers the hard costs of Third Tuesdays, making it possible for us to stage these events free of charge to participants. Thank you CNW!

The First Podcamp Ottawa

Mark Blevis, co-founder of Podcasters Across Borders and Canadian Podcast Buffet is organizing the first Podcamp Ottawa this Sunday.

Podcamp is an Unconference. So, people who feel they have some knowledge or expertise they’d like to share with other participants can slot themselves into the schedule on the Podcamp Wiki. Speakers who’ve already indicated that they will lead sessions include Charles Hodgson, Tommy Vallier, Bob Goyetche and Mark.

Mark and I bumped into one another on Parliament Hill where he took a few minutes to discuss his plans to make Podcamp Ottawa a special experience for participants. Toward the end, he also provided a preview of this year’s Podcasters Across Borders.

You can watch Mark’s discussion with me by clicking on the image below.

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If you can make it to Ottawa this Sunday, sign up to attend PodCamp Ottawa.

 

Terry Fallis talks about Inside PR

Inside PRTerry Fallis and David Jones have been nominated for a Podcast Award for their work on Inside PR.

Inside PR is part of my weekly listening routine. The guys are always interesting and entertaining. You can tell that they are true friends with great personal chemistry. (Disclosure: Terry co-founded Thornley Fallis with me and I’ve worked with Dave both as a colleague and a client.)

I get to see Terry every day. But the vast majority of Inside PR listeners have probably only heard his voice. So, I decided that Inside PR’s nomination would be a good reason to conduct a video interview with Terry.

Terry talks about the history of Inside PR, its content and focus, some of the lessons he has learned from the experience (If you’re thinking of starting a podcast, this section is a must-watch) and the challenge of keeping it fresh after more than seventy weekly episodes.

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I didn’t have a chance to arrange for David to be in the room with Terry. But I’ll try to make it to his office at Fleishman Hillard in the near future to get his perspective.

Oh, and if you’re a fan of Inside PR like I am, don’t forget to cast your vote for Inside PR.

Managing Your Social Media

We are becoming overloaded with a surfeit of social media sites and tools. We can either break under the load of options or we can find ways to cope, to manage our social media.

Bryan Person came all the way from Boston (6 hour drive) to talk to Podcasters Across Borders about how he manages these tools – and we’re glad he did.

Bryan Person-1 First, you have to make hard decisions. Make choices among the essential tools.

Develop a routine to allow you to cover things quickly. For example: Email; Twitter; Facebook; Calendar; Blog Reader. Then you’re good to go.

Using Tagging to save items associated with terms that are meaningful to you.

Prune your feedreader subscriptions. In fact, think of deleting all of them. You’ll quickly re-subscribe to those feeds that really matter to you.

Trust your network for recommendations. You don’t need to subscribe to or read everything. If one of your friends spot something that he or she thinks is important, they’ll pass it along to you.

Finally, be prepared to step away. Turn your computer off. Enjoy life. Then you can come back to the computer refreshed.

Getting your podcast seen as well as heard

To find information, most people search for a term on Google, Yahoo or MSN. And these Search engines don’t really care about sound. They care about text.

So, how do you, as a podcaster get Google to notice you?

Julien Smith-1 That’s the question that Julien Smith provided a practical, straightforward answer to this question in his presentation at Podcasters Across Borders.

First, podcasters need to become more than just a podcaster. You need to be Web producers. That means communicating through a blog, communicating through Twitter, through forums, through a variety of channels and media.

Second, you must pay attention to the keywords that people are using to find you. Subscribe to sites like SEOBook and SearchEngineLand to learn basic Search Engine Optimization techniques.

Don’t forget to post show notes for all of your podcasts. Use key words that describe your content.

Julien has many more tips. But, he only had 30 minutes for his presentation. So, if you get a chance to attend a session with Julien, grab it. You’ll learn a lot.